Beach Slang & Tim Kasher

Beach Slang & Tim Kasher

Field Mouse

Sat, December 19, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

First Unitarian Church

Philadelphia, PA

$13.00 - $15.00

This event is all ages

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Beach Slang
Beach Slang
We’ve been waiting for a while and finally it’s here. Over the past two years Beach Slang have proved themselves as a band who can write memorable songs, share that energy live and create a community of like-minded fans but they’ve always been missing one important element: An album. Luckily the band’s full-length The Things We Do To Find People Who Feel Like Us is the culmination of their collective career and picks up where their two critically acclaimed 7-inches, 2014’s Cheap Thrills On A Dead End Street and Who Would Ever Want Something So Broken? left off.

The feelings of youth and vulnerability lie at the core of Beach Slang’s music, which is part punk, part pop and all catharsis. It references the ghosts of the Replacements but keeps one foot firmly rooted in the present. It’s fun and it’s serious. It’s sad but it isn’t. It’s Beach Slang. This Philadelphia-based act have built their hype the old-fashioned way, without any gimmicks or marketing teams, which makes sense when you consider that frontman and writer James Alex cut his teeth in the celebrated pop-punk act Weston while drummer JP Flexner, bassist Ed McNulty and guitarist Ruben Gallego also played in buzzed about projects such as Ex-Friends, Nona and Glocca Morra respectively. However there’s something indefinable about Beach Slang’s music that evokes the spirit of punk and juxtaposes it into something that’s as brutally honest as it is infectiously catchy.

“By and large we subscribe to the idea of “if it isn’t broken, we’re not going to fix it’ so, yeah, we came at this recording in very much the same way,” Alex explains when asked how they approached the new songs from a sonic perspective. “I mean, we had more time to make this album, which is a cool thing, but time can also be a strange overthinker. Really, we’ve just always wanted to make our things sound like well recorded live records.” he continues, adding that the biggest difference this time around is the fact that engineer Dave Downham stepped up to co-produce this album and the fact that the band has finally found a full-time fourth member in guitarist Ruben Gallego. “Having both of them and their ears involved definitely helped a lot. I hardly listen back to things in the studio. For me, if it feels right, it’s a keeper. But, yeah, there’s something pretty alright about striking a balance.”

Obviously there has been demand for a Beach Slang album since they exploded onto the scene, however the band was very careful not to rush out something before it was totally ready. “I write every day regardless of what else is happening. And what we wanted to make happen was as many live shows as possible. There’s an importance in that, a necessity. Rock & roll isn’t meant to exist on computer screens, you know?” Correspondingly the hundreds of shows that the band played between this album and the EP is all now automatically embedded in their recorded output. “I’m hardly concerned about our music being technically precise. I want to make sure it has soul, that it’s honest. The imperfections…that’s the really good stuff. We don’t ever want it to be perfect.”

While The Things We Do To Find People Who Feel Like Us further expands on Beach Slang’s unique sound, it also showcases their sonic diversity. From the shoegazing sheen of “Noisy Heaven” to the downbeat dreaminess of “Porno Love” and refracted rage of “Young & Alive,” the album is a fuzzed-out masterpiece that takes influence from the past while staying rooted in the present. “Certainly we are going to sound like Beach Slang because, you know, we are but we didn’t want to make this record a xerox of anything we’ve done. That stuff has no guts, you know?,” Alex explains. “Even if you go from the first EP to the second EP there’s a nice, little arc and range of things happening. I think that’s even more true of this record.”

“There’s a line in that first song ‘Throwaways’ that goes ‘there’s a time to bleed and a time just to fucking run”: I’ve sung that line so many times between developing and writing the thing and I still get that little-hair-standing-up-on-my-arm moment every time I say it,” Alex says. It’s probably because the sentiments that he’s expressing have never been a choice. “Certainly there’s an element of nostalgia inherent in the writing because a good bit is reflective but it never lodges in the past; it’s more of a battle cry to now and where we’re going. Look, growing up and getting serious is wildly overrated stuff. Don’t listen to it. Jump around with a guitar. Play records loud. Never retire from being alive. Move on it.”

That movement is alternately beautiful and crushing. It’s blazing and plodding, silent and deafening but always progressing and pushing toward that barely visible beacon in the horizon. The Things We Do To Find People Who Feel Like Us is just a giant step closer to our destination.
Tim Kasher
Tim Kasher
Whereas The Game Of Monogamy was an orchestral album filled with theatrical arrangements, Adult Film favors less ornate, equally impactful instrumentation across its 10 affecting tracks. The album is filled with variations of Kasher’s signature blend of ruminative rock/pop, ranging from raucous and barreling (“American Lit,” “Truly Freaking Out”) to uneasy and undulating (“Where’s Your Heart Lie,” the dreamy “Lay Down Your Weapons”), from deceptively bright and poppy (“The Willing Cuckold,” “A Raincloud is a Raincloud”) to tempered and cascading (“You Scare Me To Death,” “A Lullaby, sort of”). Lyrically, Kasher is at his incisive best, thematically elastic and touching on aging (self-reflection and taking stock), mortality (one’s own and others’), and relationships of all kinds.

Kasher is joined on Adult Film by Sara Bertuldo (bass, vocals), Patrick Newbery (organ, keys, synths, horns), and Dylan Ryan (drums) – who backed him while touring around The Game Of Monogamy – as well as additional artists including Nate Kinsella (drums; of Make Believe and Birthmark) and Laura Stevenson (vocals; of Laura Stevenson and the Cans), among others. The album was mixed by John Congleton (St. Vincent, Wye Oak, Explosions In The Sky) at Elmwood Recording in Dallas, TX.
Field Mouse
Field Mouse
A make-your-own CD recording booth was privy to Rachel Browne's first recording in 1999, a cover of No Doubt's "Just a Girl". It would be another many years before she enrolled at SUNY Purchase, where she majored in music composition and met Andrew Futral, a producer and musician. The two began collaborating musically and in 2010 Field Mouse was officially formed.

If 2014's 'Hold Still' Life was the fruition of Field Mouse's evolution from a fiery two-piece into a fully-fledged band, then new album Episodic (August 5, Topshelf Records) is the letting go; the abandonment of past persuasions for something altogether more untamed. Where the band's initial work was self-recorded by founding members Rachel Browne and Andrew Futral, the new record signifies the first time that the quintet has composed an album together from start-to-finish - and the result is a record that feels altogether more defined.

Recorded in Philadelphia with Hop Along's Joe Reinhart, and written through a twelve month period which delivered sudden family illness and a deteriorating relationship, 'Episodic' is fashioned from ten feverish bouts of guitar-pop; led by Browne's fearsome and fearless vocal and informed by an instrumental backing that underpins the entire record with a vibrant concoction of guitar, drums and keys.

Showcasing the band's ability to switch between mood and tone, the record shifts from the spiky immediacy of tracks such as "Accessory" and "A Widow with a Terrible Secret", to the more spacious moments, such as monumental center-piece "Beacon", without ever losing sight of the scuzzy, melodic pop songs that remain Field Mouse's distinct forte.

Featuring guest turns from Sadie Dupuis (Speedy Ortiz), Allison Crutchfield (Swearin’/Waxahatchee) and Joseph D’Agostino (Cymbals Eat Guitars), Episodic is the sound of a fully-realized band truly coming in to their own; honest, direct and immensely powerful.
Venue Information:
First Unitarian Church
2125 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19103
http://www.philauu.org/