GIRLS TO THE STAGE: Comp Release & Benefit Show For Girls Rock Philly

GIRLS TO THE STAGE: Comp Release & Benefit Show For Girls Rock Philly

Amanda X, Mannequin Pussy, Fake Boyfriend, Shannen Moser, Roya, VVeed VVolf

Wed, April 29, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

First Unitarian Church

Philadelphia, PA

$8.00 - $10.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

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GIRLS TO THE STAGE: Comp Release & Benefit Show For Girls Rock Philly
Girls to the Stage is a compilation created to promote Philly's finest females who are already doing the damn thing and to empower other ladies to pick up an instrument and join 'em. These wonderful artists were gracious enough to let us to record one track each, put it on a tape with Girls Cartel Records, and throw this show to see 'em shred, all the proceeds of which benefit Girls Rock Philly!!

Peep one of the tracks here, and check out all the bands below!
https://girlstothestage.bandcamp.com/
Amanda X
Amanda X
Born out of the Kensington neighborhood of North Philadelphia, where you can't throw a rock without hitting a great band, Amanda X is the three-piece antidote to bumming on grey days and the Sunday night blues. The Philadelphian women—Cat Park on guitar, Melissa Brain on drums, and Kat Bean on bass—make music to remind you that colorful riffs and lilting oo's are meant to complement post-punk shredding and astute songwriting. Their debut full-length, Amnesia, rattled you out of your wintertime slumber like a cannonball straight into the pool, and their sophomore record, Giant, brings more expressive solos, sharper vocals, and a few shots straight through the heart by way of a grimey Fender guitar and production by Steve Poponi at Gradwell House Recording.

Amanda X self-released their bedroom-cozy EP, Ruin the Moment, in 2012 to great acclaim, taking the sunny-serious vibes with them to venues all over Philadelphia, as well as on a number of tours up and down the East Coast and Canada. They’ve since toured all over the country, opening for bands like Parquet Courts, Marnie Stern, Dum Dum Girls, FIDLAR, The Vaselines, The Thermals, and Protmartyr, bringing playful stage banter, garagey guitar earworms, and dual harmonies that hit just as hard live.

After catching wind of their dedicated show schedule and powerful new songs, Philadelphia's own Siltbreeze picked up their first album; their followup will release digitally with Charlotte-based Self-Aware Records. The release of the sophomore record sees the trio growing their songwriting for a wider audience—just as strong, just as fast, but with a cleaner edge, one laced with an ever-present mix of sadness and hope. The lovely melodies and honey-tinged singalongs they've built their sound on are just as available, but now with wider eyes and more cutting lyrics. All of the proceeds from their sophomore followup will be donated to Women Against Abuse, a local Philly organization.

Imagine if Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks took a few lessons from The Raincoats, or if the K Records lineup of yesteryear had a little more distortion in their repertoire. Amanda X manages to deliver smarts and sweets in poppy songs so tightly packed that they come with a punch so strong they are really, really hard to forget.
Mannequin Pussy
Mannequin Pussy
There are certain ineffable qualities to being a punk band that exists meaningfully. In the most simplistic terms, within the music there must be some sort of art practice, something communicative. Even in its most barebones brashness, precise construction goes a long way. This has never been a problem for Philadelphia’s Mannequin Pussy. With two full-length albums, 2014’s G.P. and 2016’s Romantic, inspiring critical acclaim from places like Pitchfork, NPR, Stereogum, the A.V. Club and more, it’s something impossible to describe and impossibly easy to notice. “Being in a punk band where you don’t want to take yourself too seriously while trying to aggressively make art through your music,” frontwoman Marisa Dabice explains of the band’s objective, “I think people sometimes expect kitschy-ness and I don’t want to do that.” There’s no danger of it.

Mannequin Pussy began as a duo between childhood best friends Dabice and guitarist Thanasi Paul. The pair wrote together, eventually feeling pressure to record a collection of songs. They did, and the bulk of Dabice’s first ever original material became their debut release, G.P. The demos showed immediate promise: Dabice’s idiosyncratic guitar playing of someone rediscovering their musical edge and Paul’s instrumental mobility. G.P. is a hopeful sort of scrappy experiment—but one that wouldn’t fully realize Mannequin Pussy until the duo met their creative collaborators in bassist Colins “Bear” Regisford and drummer Kaleen Reading.

Now a quartet, the band’s sophomore LP, Romantic, embodies Mannequin Pussy’s greatness: 20-minutes of hungry, genre-defying eclecticism that no longer feels like a collection of tracks but a record of real, discernible cohesion. Romantic kicks off with its title track, Dabice whisper-singing intimate vignettes of loneliness before exploding into trash-punk realizations—it’s hard to miss the mark when she offers the eyebrow-furrowing scream “I’m in hell.” It proceeds “Emotional High,” the most loving track on the record—a punk-pop anthem that removes itself from the transparent toxicity of some of the album’s other themes, or the progressive politicism of a song like “Pledge,” which offers the listener a new pledge of allegiance, one to themselves and no one else.

At their heart, Mannequin Pussy is a band that mosaics, taking unlike parts and making something new and whole from it’s unique pieces. It’s the direct result an artistic marriage between it’s four members, helmed by Dabice’s no non-sense, vulnerable and strong worldview. “What we hope for when people experience our music is a cathartic release, to not feel so alone in the emotions that most of us have, to maybe see the way other people experience theirs,” she says of the band’s aspirations. “Above all, the hope is that someone can listen to this album, feel connected to it on a personal level and have it set them free from all the toxic feelings that we hold on to.” It’s evident that they will, and do.
Fake Boyfriend
Fake Boyfriend
Fake Boyfriend began in October 2014 as an exhaust pipe for the feelings of three close friends. Beautiful melodic harmonies drift through cathartic songwriting punctuated by femme-angst, a raw punk delivery and maniacal laughter.
Shannen Moser
Shannen Moser
Hailing from Berks County Pennsylvania, Shannen Moser grew up steeped in folk and country music. Influenced by the historically rich area, stretching farmland, and local folkers, Shannen credits the area with giving her the tools to write the music she does today. Her self- taught guitar plucking style and confessional lyricism are evocative of the area she grew up in. She vividly recalls her first encounter with folk music in her dad’s old truck, playing “Be here in the Morning” by Townes Van Zandt. Since then her love for songwriting has continued to grow.

In 2014 Shannen moved to Philadelphia to pursue her music more earnestly. Her latest recording, the debut LP “Oh My Heart” was released in January this year and has taken her from small bedroom recordings to a more expansive sound. Mostly recorded in a barn in Earlville, New York by Eric Muth, the record moves forward sonically while preserving the sincerity of her earlier work and showcasing Moser’s folk and country influences. The record was later finished in Philadelphia at the Knife Lair, a new studio project headed by Eric Muth and Wyatt Oberholzer. Accompanied by cello from Julia Peters, keys by Joe Evers, and guitar and auxiliary by Muth, Shannen’s band has helped her solo acoustic project evolve into a fuller sounding project. “Oh My Heart” moves beyond the sketchbooks of Shannen’s earlier work and proves an arrival for both her and her band.
Roya
Roya
"like fleetwood mac but more witchy"
"like phantogam but less sexy"
"like slayer but not at all"
VVeed VVolf
VVeed VVolf
2 friends writing music with various people over the years.
Venue Information:
First Unitarian Church
2125 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19103
http://www.philauu.org/