MAD DECENT BLOCK PARTY 2013 AFTER PARTY w/ Diplo & Friends

MAD DECENT BLOCK PARTY 2013 AFTER PARTY w/ Diplo & Friends

Blaqstarr, Dirty South Joe, Ruxbin

Sat, July 27, 2013

Doors: 10:00 pm / Show: 10:00 pm

SoundGarden Hall

Philadelphia, PA

$25.00

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

Facebook comments:

Diplo
Diplo
Known internationally as a curator amongst the world's most cutting edge DJs, producers, and musical movements Wesley Pentz (better known as DIPLO) has experienced a variety of successes. The last few years have been spent running through the club circuit and having chart-topping hits with refreshing irreverence. Born in Tupelo, Mississippi, in 1978, Pentz spent most his childhood in Florida working in his fathers bait shop and being turned onto music through then new mediums like MTV. Drifting North through the state came Miami Bass and from the West came the sounds of Southern hip-hop artists. The musical influence and variety coalesced, and at 18, Pentz moved to Philadelphia for college at Temple University to study Film & Music. While a student he took a job in the South Philadephia community as a social worker and created the influential Hollertronix club night, which was the beginning of his fledgling career as DIPLO.

In 2004 Pentz released his debut album as Diplo called, Florida. It received praise and accolades in the underground community. The music embodied on this album led to an introduction via an A&R man at XL Records to M.I.A. In 2004 he partnered with M.I.A. for the mixtape Piracy Funds Terrorism. Pentz's cultural impact had started to snowball. Together they worked on her first album Arular and much of her second Kala, including the 2008 mega-hit "Paper Planes," which reached No. 3 in the US Charts and earned him a Grammy nomination for Record of the Year. His production credits have evolved since to include Santigold, Lil' Jon and Missy Elliot, while remixing works by Beck, Radiohead, Britney Spears and countless others. In 2009 Pentz teamed with frequent collaborator Dave Taylor (aka Switch) to release the futuristic dancehall album Guns Don't Kill People… Lazers Do under the guise of Major Lazer, a Jamaican militant at war with an evil army of zombies, mummies and vampires.

Meanwhile, his record label Mad Decent has helped to introduce Brazilian baile funk, Angolan Kuduro and other marginalized music to clubs around the world, developing as a trendsetting force with which to be reckoned. With the same mission in mind, some of the varied acts Pentz has signed or produced include Rye Rye, Bonde do Role, Crookers, Blaqstarr, Boy 8-Bit, Buraka Som Systema, and Rusko, allowing Mad Decent to act as a launching pad or home base for many others while spreading its influence across the globe. Through the label, Pentz has founded a charity called Heaps Decent as a social relief program to help children in Australia as well as with additional efforts internationally. In early 2009 Pentz debuted his film Favela on Blast, a five-years-in-the-making documentary exploring the Brazilian slum favelas of Rio de Janeiro and the thriving baile funk music scene that exists within. He is currently developing a TV show.

Through a widespread assortment of releases and artists' works – from cumbia to dubstep to punk and beyond – Diplo has shown dynamic range with interests that span far beyond any singular culture or musical realm, standing as a working model for the truly 21st Century artist.
Blaqstarr
Blaqstarr
Baltimore-based DJ, producer, and artist, Blaqstarr, produced his first “club banger,” when he was 16-years old, a local Baltimore Club track that he produced called “Tote It.” In fact, before he was even 20 years old, Blaqstarr (real name Charles Smith) had produced over half-a-dozen original tracks that were the biggest tunes in Bmore and whether they were broadcast in his own sets at some eastside house party or spun on the radio at a neighborhood block jam, seemingly every tune Blaqstarr would put out has been a straight “club banger.”

It’s that Midas touch of Blaqstarr’s that thrust him out of the typically provincial, claustrophobic world of B-more clubland and into the world at large. It’s why M.I.A. trusted a then relatively unknown Blaqstarr as a key collaborator for her wildly original second album (Kala) and its hit single, “Paper Planes.” And it’s why Blaqstarr found a home as part of Diplo’s Mad Decent family and got to take his music around the world. In just a short period of time, Blaqstarr’s seemingly effortless string of catchy, booming club tracks has made him one of the most anticipated and observed beat-makers in the world. And it is in that atmosphere that the 25-year old releases the Divine EP, his first release through Interscope Records.

“Baltimore is such a small world, but there’s so much love there for the music, that most people never need to leave,” says Blaqstarr. “Baltimore folks like music fast – that’s the sound of the city – and if you can make the beats fast and the floor shake, you can be a star right there for a long time. Never have to go nowhere else.”

Indeed, for the uninitiated, Baltimore Club music has been the soundtrack to life in the onetime thriving port city for over two decades: built on fast beats, booty shaking, raunchy lyrics in songs and suggestive call-and-response provocations from DJs armed with mics. It’s the ubiquitous soundtrack of an entire city of people blowing off steam from an otherwise struggling, frustrating environment. And it only exists in Baltimore – a little north in Philly, and they don’t get it; a little south in DC and they’d rather hear the punch of go-go music. Local Bmore DJs can make more money off the thousands of mix-CDs they sell at local mom-and-pop stores than they would if they had a hit single on national radio.

Since 2003, some of Blaqstarr’s songs that found audiences beyond Baltimore include, “Rider Girl,” “Hands Up Thumbs Down,” and “Shake It To The Ground,” featuring the Baltimore vocalist/MC (and fellow Interscope artist) Rye Rye who he discovered, and released on his own Starr Productions label. The song has a catchy hook and an irresistible bounce, but what made “Shake It To The Ground” a fast-traveling hit outside city limits was the way Blaqstarr chopped up Rye Rye’s vocals into rapid-firing syllables that sounded like MPC-created samples; and how Blaqstarr stitched together the song’s rhythm track from what sounds like multiple layers of beats at different speeds, creating a mesmerizing syncopation to the whole tune. The song bears a sophistication to its production that draws people to it, even if they can’t point out exactly why.

That is what has helped propel Blaqstarr beyond the confines of Baltimore – a fierce desire to try out different ideas matched with a fearlessness and curiosity. One of Blaqstarr’s signature tunes is “Tote It,” in which instead of using standard drum sounds or a sampled break, the percussion of the fast-paced club banger was sampled gun-shots. It was something no one had thought of doing before, and perfectly symbolized that kind of sound of the city. “When I dropped that for the first time,” he says, “the party went wild.” Club Banger, indeed.

For the Divine EP – and the album he plans to record shortly thereafter – Blaqstarr is looking to explore more of his collaborative songwriting than simply his beat-making; that is, more of what he did in working with M.I.A. on MAYA than the club bangers he’s mostly known for. He admits to being really fascinated with the art and form of the pop song, as well as with more experimental instrumental hip-hop and the palette those abstract compositions might offer. “But I’m still gonna do the club shit,” he says. “It’s universally correct. I can’t leave those out. It’s in my soul.”
Dirty South Joe
Dirty South Joe
Joey “Dirty South Joe” Massarueh began his professional DJ career in 1990 at Washington D.C.’s infamous 9:30 Club, where he pioneered a multi genre style of DJing that rings more popular than ever today. Rap music was his first love, and an eventual move to NYC in the mid nineties provided the backdrop for his personal growth in hip hop, which incidentally led him back to his dirty South roots. In 2002 he relocated to Philadelphia, where he began his tenure as the buyer and manager of Armand’s Records. It was there that he met kindred musical spirits; DJs Low Budget (also an employee) and Diplo. Armand’s was the de facto home base and inspiration behind the Hollertronix sound and “movement.” It was also there where he fell in love with the sound of Baltimore Club Music, and released a final EP with the Responsible Space Playboy crew, buoyed by the Bmore inspired “Jussapimp,” which was Philly’s first official foray into the genre. Joe runs The Brick Bandits Crew which one of, if not the most formidable force within today’s Baltimore Club music scene. With over 60 members. Dirty South Joe has done a series of mixes with Mad Decent such as LuvStep, and Blood Bros and is also the mastermind behind Mad Decent Mondays in Philadelphia.
Ruxbin
Ruxbin
DJ Aaron Ruxbin spins vinyl records in a variety of genres. Actual Records.
Venue Information:
SoundGarden Hall
520 N Columbus Blvd
Philadelphia, PA, 19123
http://www.soundgardenhall.com/