Daughters

Daughters

Self Defense Family, Street Sects

Fri, November 2, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

First Unitarian Church

Philadelphia, PA

$20.00 - $22.00

This event is all ages

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Daughters
Daughters
Daughters is vocalist Alexis Marshall, guitar player Nick Sadler, drummer Jon Syverson and bass player Sam Walker. Following the release of their 2010 self-titled album, the band took an indefinite hiatus, returning in 2013 for a pair of sold out hometown shows in Providence, and a subsequent smattering of live dates in the intervening years, including joining Dillinger Escape Plan for their final live outings in December of 2017. Daughters have been hailed for their visceral performances, both live and on record, with Pitchfork describing them as “manic” and “pummeling” and Punk News pointing to their “frantic energy” and “spastic urgency.”
Self Defense Family
Self Defense Family
Ask any touring musician and they’ll agree: years spent on the road can be measured like dog years. Over time, the unpredictable nature of the lifestyle starts to become not only predictable, but all-consuming. On the band’s latest full-length Have You Considered Punk Music, singer Patrick Kindlon reflects on his time as a musician, taking a closer look at the bottomless drive to create that he’s spent his life exploring. “I’ve been doing something for a long time that I find really fulfulling, and I’m able to look at it with more clarity as time passes,” says Kindlon. “I can look at things from 10 years ago, or the reason I even got involved in this thing in the first place, with more perspective. The changes I’ve gone through as a person over time are interesting to me. I spend almost all my waking hours making things, and that’s a relationship I assumed was normal, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve started to understand that that’s not the way everybody is looking at life,” says Kindlon.

His choice to reflect on his experiences isn’t a topic he discusses with ease - “It makes me sound like I’m 200 years old,” he jokes - but it’s one he does well, distilling personal, specific experiences into simple and relatable metaphors. “It’s about feeling very intensely about a thing you’re becoming increasingly aware the rest of the world doesn’t give a shit about,” says Kindlon. “It’s like how people feel about their cats: they love their cat, but you don’t give a shit about their cat.”

Kindlon’s passion for making music is matched by his bandmates. While many bands have found themselves stuck in a rut after years of making music together, Self Defense Family’s unique structure ensures that the band never ends up at a dead end. Their tours aren’t mandatory, but instead an open invitation to whoever would like to come, whether that be three members or seven. Their recording process is equally as open ended; when one member gets creatively burnt out, another will take their place, often offering a new take on the song at hand in the process. This type of system can lend itself to chaos at times, but to the band, it’s worth it in the end. “While it can be frustrating to sift through a million ideas, at least you have a million ideas to sift through,” says Kindlon.

The album was recorded in just under two weeks, the longest the band has ever spent in the studio at one time. As they often do, the musicians in the group who chose to participate in the project came to the studio completely unprepared and wrote the songs as they tracked them. “For us, recording is largely about first takes,” says Kindlon. “We don’t see recording as creating a product - we see it as capturing whatever’s going on at the moment, and if we mess it up, we’ll do better next time. This album is different for us in the respect that it’s a fairly polished final product.” It’s a perfect fit for a record about making records - that, simultaneously, the band hones in on their craft while dissecting the craft itself.
Street Sects
Street Sects
Supported by Pitchfork, Vice, Rolling Stone, Bandcamp, and The Needle Drop, and recently having completed a North American tour with Dalek, Street Sects has recorded two new tracks, one of which is built on disassembled parts of a Controlled Bleeding song. This new 7" is pressed on 7" vinyl and is exclusive to Toronto-based Artoffact Records.

Things Will Be Better in Hell is a two song 7" single about love and relationships. Side A, Things Will Be Better in Hell, is a view from within the confines of a codependent relationship, one where addiction and love have become inseparable. Where getting clean means getting out, and is therefore unthinkable. The core mainframe of this song was built from digital reworkings of live drum samples recorded by Alton Jenkins of Future Death.

Side B, Bite Down Hard, takes a look at a "successful" relationship. In love, the word "forever" means until the end of life. But what happens if you make it? If you manage to stay loyal to one person, one idea, one position until your final days, how does that feel? Do you look back upon your life with a sense of pride and accomplishment, or do you lament the missed opportunities, and wonder how things might have been? Built entirely from samples that were pulled from Controlled Bleeding's "Return of the Quiet", "Bite Down Hard" was originally intended to be included on Controlled Bleeding's Carving Songs, a collection of remixes of songs from Larva Lumps and Baby Bumps, but as the song came together it became clear that the track was less of a "remix", and more of a Street Sects original composition, therefore warranting a separate release.
Venue Information:
First Unitarian Church
2125 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19103
http://www.philauu.org/