Fucked Up

Fucked Up

Candy, Bad Waitress

Fri, November 9, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

First Unitarian Church

Philadelphia, PA

$17.00 - $20.00

This event is all ages

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Fucked Up
Fucked Up
“Never sink and never hide / They tried to break our dream, but child: / Joy Stops Time”.

I was sent an unfinished version of Dose Your Dreams so that I might contribute string parts. I couldn’t stop listening to the rough mixes I received. A friend asked me how the record was. I replied, “My God, Fucked Up have made their Screamadelica.”

And psych-rock-groove it is. The drums mixed wide, propensity for drones, for delay pedal, for repetition, groove. The politics and aesthetics of hardcore married to an “open format” approach to genre. Elements of doo-wop, krautrock, groove, digital hardcore.

“None of Your Business Man” opens the album in familiar enough territory, a sax-assisted exit from an office space. But things get psychedelic very quickly. By the time the title track arrives, Mike Haliechuk is whispering, wah pedals are in full effect, and we’re wearing oversized t-shirts and pinwheeling. “Accelerate,” the lyrical centerpiece of the album, storms in like Boredoms on a bullet train and dissolves into a digital nightmare. The album closer, “Joy Stops Time,” finds Fucked Up at their most Düsseldorfian, nearly eight minutes of blissful motorik.

At the center of it all is Damian Abraham’s scream—a man chained, a man tortured, a true protagonist. The effect is one of an epic, every chapter attempting its own narrative devices, its own genre hybridization—and it works, it works so insanely well. The drama unfolds like a miniature world of many parts being explored, a map being illuminated, location by location.

As with David Comes to Life, there is a story here. David—who once came to life—is now indentured to a desk job. David meets the elderly Joyce who closes his eyes, opens his mind, and sends him on a spiritual journey. David embarks on his own metaphysical odyssey. He sees a stage adaptation of his own life. He speaks to an angel in a lightbulb. He sees an infinite series of universes as simulations within simulations.

Meanwhile, Lloyd—Joyce’s lover—was sent, decades ago, by Joyce on the same odyssey, but was lost in the void. Lloyd seeks to be found and reunited with his lover. Where will David end up? Will Joyce and Lloyd be reunited?

Dose Your Dreams—meaning: treat your dreams as you would a dream, allow yourself to be lost within them, allow them to open your heart and your mind, enjoy them as you would a drug. Reach out for my hand and pull me close.

—Owen Pallett
June 2018
Candy
Candy has once again teamed up with Triple B Records for their most fantastical and sinister release yet. Keeping in line with the artistic dualities of pleasure and pain, fact and fiction, peace and violence, their debut LP Good to Feel delivers 9 songs of their most ambitious and focused material to date. Aligning with the esteemed engineer and producer Arthur Rizk, Candy has finally achieved the type of artistry that transcends the confines of its own medium. Where they once dabbled in the marriage of noise and image, Good to Feel succeeds in its pull from deep cinematic wells. Utilizing the atmosphere of films such as Escape from New York and Akira, Candy’s new record grants the listener a psychotic joyride into a world one misstep away from absolute obliteration. Environmental devastation, police violence, political corruption, and a myriad of tragedies privy to the human experience all make their way into the vaudeville demonstration that is Good to Feel.
Bad Waitress
Bad Waitress is a fierce and playful punk rock slap to the face comprised of four young Toronto women. It isn't just a coincidence that they're all women either: vocalist/guitarist Kali-Ann Butala moved to Toronto from the Northwest Territories five years specifically with the desire to play with other women. The band’s May 2017 EP, Doll Creatures of the Valley, which was mixed and mastered by Kali-Ann, plays along this theme in a cheeky and subversive way, with the biting “We’re Girls,” (“We’re girls/We’re here/We’re ready to fight”) to the witchy chanting of “Devil’s Vagina,” and the EP’s titular track, “Doll Creatures of the Valley,” which begins with eerie, doll-like voices before the heavy guitar takes over.

​But it would be wrong to pigeonhole the artists-formerly-known-as-Nude-Dogs as just girl punk. Their influences may include such punk stalwarts as Fugazi and Gang of Four, with comparisons to acts like 7 Year Bitch and Babes in Toyland, but there’s something a little extra mixed in there, too. Butala’s Howlin’ Wolf tattoo is what she and guitarist Katelyn Molgard initially bonded over. The whole band – rounded out by drummer Eva Moon and bassist Jessica Maxwell – describe themselves as inseparable, and the enjoyment they have from making music together is certainly palpable. Their live shows are vicious and fun, regularly self-booked, and maybe best characterized by the direct missive from their song “Fuck This,” which opens with the chant: “F-U-C-K/What’s the words we wanna say” before launching into the song at full force. The band’s contagious energy would get the point across anyway, but the track is a short, but not very sweet, mission statement: “I just wanna say/Fuck This.”

With a planned release of April 2018, Bad Waitress’ new EP, Party Bangers: Volume 1, moves away from the different vibes of Doll Creatures and into a heavier, party-focused sound, resting on a commitment keep having fun as loudly and rowdily as possible.
Venue Information:
First Unitarian Church
2125 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19103
http://www.philauu.org/