Sorority Noise

Sorority Noise

Remo Drive, Jelani Sei, Caracara

Fri, April 6, 2018

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

First Unitarian Church

Philadelphia, PA

$17.00 - $20.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

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Sorority Noise
Sorority Noise
SORORITY NOISE write important songs. They go to uncomfortable places, unafraid to let the darkness in – but they’re also not shy at kicking back until the sorrow subsides. They’re songs of confusion, anger, life, death, mental health and, most importantly, hope. They’re what it means to be human.

That vulnerability has been Sorority Noise’s hallmark since they formed in 2013, but it’s never been as precise as it is on YOU’RE NOT AS ___ AS YOU THINK, their third album, set for release March 17th via Triple Crown Records. The album follows the Connecticut-based quartet’s IT KINDLY STOPPED FOR ME 7” (2016), critically acclaimed JOY, DEPARTED (2015) and debut FORGETTABLE (2014) and is the most collaborative, fully realized version of Sorority Noise to date.

Sorority Noise recorded You’re Not As ___ As You Think with producer Mike Sapone (Brand New, Taking Back Sunday) over the span of 10 days – three times longer than it took to track Joy, Departed – and this increased time allowed the band to hone the songwriting and visceral performances that have launched them onto tours with Modern Baseball, Citizen, Turnover and The Menzingers and into outlets like Pitchfork, Consequence of Sound, The Fader, Spin, AV Club and Stereogum.

Singer/guitarist Cameron Boucher, who prefers not to edit or overthink his lyrics, empties both his pen and soul on songs like “No Halo,” “Disappeared” and “A Portrait Of,” stark vignettes that find him coming to terms with the death of close friends. He’s had days, weeks and months to confront these and other emotions, and when it came time to write about them, the words spilled out.

So what you’re getting is an emotional bulldozer – an unfiltered, inward look at the last year of the band’s life that’s filled with intimate, visceral details yet remains universally relatable. But even amidst heavy subject matter, Sorority Noise want to give you a sense of resilience. “No matter what I feel, it’s going to be OK,” Boucher says. “Things are going to be tough, but it’s going to be fine in the end – and you have to keep going because you just have to. This is how it’s going to be. You’ve just got to do it.”

It’s in this way that the album’s title comes into view, and it only takes inserting a few adjectives – sad, happy, rich, poor – to realize life is all about perspective. Hardships are inevitable, but so is hope. Rather than living in the shadows, Sorority Noise have learned the only way to move past the struggle is by never stopping moving forward into the sun.
Remo Drive
Remo Drive
Dubbing your debut full-length Greatest Hits might be a bit of a misnomer—or, at worst, signs of a serious superiority complex—but there’s no bravado when it comes to REMO DRIVE. Instead, the Minnesota-based duo’s first album for Epitaph Records serves as the pinnacle of their four-plus years as a band up until now.

Brothers Erik and Stephen Paulson formed Remo Drive in high school in 2013, inspired by “older kids who smoked weed and listened to Title Fight.” The pair of wide-eye musicians would find their legs in the emo world, but the songs on Greatest Hits—enveloped in themes of suburban malaise and self-reflection—shape-shift throughout all aspects of alternative rock, paying tribute not only to Midwestern emo heavyweights like American Football and The Promise Ring, but also to ’90s grunge and classic rock, among others.

“It’s always going to be about loud guitars and big drums,” Erik Paulson says of Remo Drive’s sound. “The best thing for us to do is not worry so much about aesthetic and focus on whatever feels natural with the overarching idea of being a rock ’n’ roll band.”

That innate honesty permeates every area of the band’s frenetic, spazzy music, from Erik’s lyrics (“I just want to be as honest and straight to the point as possible rather than trying to appear smarter than I actually am”) to the charming DIY video for “Yer Killing Me” that features the band sprinting down the streets of their hometown, instruments and all.

It’s like Remo Drive—unlike many bands under their same genre umbrella—haven’t forgotten that writing and playing music is supposed to be fun. “We try to do things with a lot of energy and gusto,” Paulson says. “I think people can tell that we care a lot. I think our best quality is that we care.”

But at the same time, the Paulson brothers share a deep passion and desire for improvement. Erik is 20, Stephen 22; they’ve got their entire musical lives ahead of them. So while the exuberance and irreverence stands as a hallmark of the music they make now, deep down they’re driven to continue progressing as musicians and songwriters.

“Intentionally not wanting to do better is dumb,” Erik says. “There was a thing for a while where emo bands didn’t try that hard. We’re trying to bring back some of the technique with it. If someone’s doing your taxes, you’d hope they know what they’re doing. If I’m making music, I think people listening want me to know what I’m doing.”

So while Greatest Hits serves as the perfect entryway to Remo Drive’s particular brand of rock, it’s ultimately a stepping stone to the Paulsons’ next evolution. But no matter how much things change, the non-negotiable aspects of Remo Drive that have turned heads until now are definitely not going to change.

“I feel like we don’t really have a voice,” Erik says. “We’re always going to end up being different every single album. Our tastes change so much. We’re not too concerned about pleasing any one group of people. The things that will be consistent are the energy and the passion. As long as it sounds awesome to us and the songs are good enough, it’ll be Remo Drive.” XX


Dubbing your debut full-length Greatest Hits might be a bit of a misnomer—or, at worst, signs of a serious superiority complex—but there’s no bravado when it comes to REMO DRIVE. Instead, the Minnesota-based duo’s first album for Epitaph Records serves as the pinnacle of their four-plus years as a band up until now.

Brothers Erik and Stephen Paulson formed Remo Drive in high school in 2013, inspired by “older kids who smoked weed and listened to Title Fight.” The pair of wide-eye musicians would find their legs in the emo world, but the songs on Greatest Hits—enveloped in themes of suburban malaise and self-reflection—shape-shift throughout all aspects of alternative rock, paying tribute not only to Midwestern emo heavyweights like American Football and The Promise Ring, but also to ’90s grunge and classic rock, among others.

“I feel like we don’t really have a voice,” Erik says. “We’re always going to end up being different every single album. Our tastes change so much. We’re too concerned about pleasing any one group of people. The things that will be consistent are the energy, the passion. As long as it sounds awesome to us and the songs are good enough, it’ll be Remo Drive.”
Jelani Sei
Jelani Sei
One of the few bands in the northeast that can lull you with ethereal soundscapes while simultaneously sending you into a a crazy mosh, Jelani Sei is a group of individuals who are constantly searching the realms of harmony to find that new groove.

Having roots in Evan Lawrence’s basement, Jelani Sei has evolved into a full lineup that includes Kayana Guity on vocals, Samuel Smith on guitar, Scott White on guitar and Enayi Tamakloe on drums. The completion of the lineup has allowed the band to reach a point of musical clarity they wouldn’t have been able to find on their own. From playing all around New England, into New York City and Philadelphia, they have developed their own sound, self dubbing it as “Progressive R&B.”

In 2017, Jelani Sei recently released, “LVNDR TWN” a six track encapsulation of their musical growth from their previous releases, as well as a conversation of the current state of the world. Jelani Sei represents not only unity, but love, passion and a drive to push oneself beyond limits they didn’t think they were capable of.
Caracara
Caracara
Distorted emotional music by Carlos, George, Sean and Will.
Venue Information:
First Unitarian Church
2125 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19103
http://www.philauu.org/