Jukebox The Ghost

A Free Show with...

Jukebox The Ghost

Norwegian Arms

Sat, August 4, 2012

Doors: 5:00 pm / Show: 6:30 pm

Morgan’s Pier

Philadelphia, PA

$0.00

Free

This event is 21 and over

All ages w/ legal parent or guardian

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Jukebox The Ghost
Jukebox The Ghost
The appeal of a modern, on the rise indie band like Jukebox the Ghost is simple: They write catchy songs. On top of that, they’re dynamic, skilled musicians. The band’s records are carefully structured, yet wildly diverse affairs. And the live show? Energetic, crowd-pleasing, cathartic. The Philly trio’s new album, produced by Peter Katis (Interpol, The National) and set for release this fall on Yep Roc, highlights all of these elements over 11 tracks, each one leaving its own unique sonic footprint. But constructing and arranging the songs to their full potential took years of preparation, both on the road and in all of the basements, houses, hotel rooms and studios where the songs were born.

“There was never a lull in songwriting, even when we were touring.” explains guitarist/co-vocalist Tommy Siegel. “We went into the studio with 25 nearly-finished and arranged songs, and we put a lot of time into crafting each one. It was a conscious effort on all of our parts to mature as a band.” Since their 2009 debut, Let Live and Let Ghosts, a sunny, piano-led explosion of pop exuberance, JTG has logged hundreds of shows and thousands of hours on tour – all of which helped the guys develop the patience and perspective needed to deliver a
more intricate and serious second record. “Sometimes, in the past, we were received as being this bubbly and jumpy and happy group,” says Ben Thornewill, Jukebox’s pianist and other vocalist. “But this record seems like we’re sounding more thoughtful and personal. Besides, you’re going to think and write differently after 300 shows. People change, different things happen to you, you get some new influences, and the way you do your songwriting and arranging is going to be different.” “It’s not wrong to say we’re fun, upbeat guys,” adds Siegel, who stayed upbeat during the album’s recording despite scheduling it around vocal surgery—a by-product of spending two years on the road (note: post-surgery, Tommy is fine). “But we’re real people, we’ve had real troubles, and all of that’s going to affect us. Besides, I think the ‘happy-fun’ label was a bit of hyperbole
– I mean, half of the songs on our first record were about the apocalypse.”

Originally formed during university in Washington D.C., Jukebox the Ghost (the name’s an amalgam of Captain Beefheart and
Nabakov references) won accolades for that first record, Let Live and Let Ghosts, which Spin Magazine called “a refreshing
reminder that the lighthearted electricity of a fantastic pop song is still filled with live wires.” The band – Thornewill, Siegel and
drummer Jesse Kristin – jelled quickly, despite their disparate musical backgrounds in everything from classical piano to prog to indie to 80s Brit-pop. Collectively, the group delivered an unabashedly upbeat, playful sound with a sly dark streak (see: the aforementioned apocalyptic lyrics).
Norwegian Arms
Norwegian Arms
Three years, two EPs and one album since his Siberian sojourn, Keith Birthday of Norwegian Arms has turned his focus away from the confines of his tiny apartment in the Taiga, which largely informed the songs on their debut LP, Wolf Like a Stray Dog. That doesn't mean that the sunny folk music generated by his time in Tomsk, Russia has become any less relevant, or that the sound has changed drastically. Instead, it's morphed from real-time cultural awe and suffering to nostalgia, and while the memories remain, new ones have taken their place. That being said, nothing has, or perhaps ever will, replace the childhood mandolin on which these songs are written, perhaps the only constant in this ever-evolving project.

In the time since returning to his native Philadelphia, Birthday has found new beauty in the wreckage that surrounds his post-industrial warehouse apartment. Dilapidated buildings, shifting friendships, and late night bicycle rides inform this new batch of songs, a celebration of deeper personal understanding. Still deeply influenced by his continued travels, these new songs draw from trips to South America and Europe, and the sense of Wanderlust remains.

Still obsessed with languages and their systems, Birthday refers to these new songs as imperfective, referring to verb 'aspect' present in Slavic languages, which focuses on the current process, not a past event or a future result. He still feels strongly that it's about the journey, not the destination, a spirit still embodied by these songs.
Venue Information:
Morgan’s Pier
221 N Columbus Blvd
Philadelphia, PA, 19123